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Kansas Deer Hunting
 

Kansas Deer Hunting

Kansas Deer Hunts

Before getting into this in depth Kansas deer hunting article as I researched data to provide unto the reader I was simply amazed at the high density of Boone and Crockett NON TYPICAL whitetail bucks that Kansas holds. Kansas is reknown for huge non typical whitetail deer. Be sure to read the buck profiles at the end of the article to see true world class non typical deer taken from Kansas.

Kansas deer hunting is one of the most sensitive or unique whitetail deer scenarios to place yourself in. Kansas has produced some of the biggest whitetail deer in the World, however Kansas has a personality all its own. Kansas deer hunts are far different than any other State we run whitetail hunts in, and possibly the oddest location I have seen for hunting trophy whitetail deer. Allow me to describe this to the best of my ability.

For many years we ran whitetail deer hunts in extreme South Central Nebraska. From some of our tree stand location in Nebraska you could actually see into North Central Kansas. For several years we searched for quality Kansas deer hunting in this area. Each time we would search for quality Kansas deer hunting in North Central Kansas we could find nothing worthy of running hunts on for trophy deer. Meanwhile just across the Republican River into Nebraska we did wonderful for many years. It left me scratching my head, because I had heard so many big whitetail deer stories surrounding Kansas deer hunts. For over 6 years we looked at Central and North Central Kansas hunting land for deer but never could really never find a worthy location in this area.

To tell you the truth as a company we simply gave up on Kansas deer hunts. I always just assumed Kansas was over rated and left it at that until late in the year of 2009. In late 2009 I was contacted by a landowner in South Eastern Kansas in Unit 11 of Kansas. After talking for quite some time we traveled to this area and frankly discovered just what all the “hype” is about surrounding Kansas deer hunting. While visiting the location, we were introduced to several people in the community whom were so nice they invited us into their homes and showed us the deer they had harvested. Unbeknownest to them they were showing us 180 to 200 inch whitetails and many of them didn’t have a clue what the deer they had on the wall scored. We had 19 year old kids showing us deer they had harvested that could easily have made the front of any Whitetail Specialty Magazine. It was nothing short of amazing.

We began to lease up an entire region of South Eastern Kansas to manage Kansas deer hunts from. Thousands and thousands and thousands of acres of ground. As we walked out and leased farms all I can tell you is the buck sign gives hint to the fact we are truly on World Class Whitetails in Kansas from Unit 11. We saw rubs on trees that looked as if Elk had made them. Whitetail deer scrapes the size of car hoods. Sheds found while walking out the farms were incredible. I found myself several times looking sheds instead of looking at the ground after we started finding so many huge sheds. It was often times hard to focus.

The things that make Kansas deer hunting so unique include deer population, tag obtainment for whitetail deer in Kansas, whitetail movement across Kansas terrain, etc.

It is estimated in the United States over 30 million whitetail deer inhabit our nation. In regard to deer population this is where some whitetail hunters will get faint of heart, however don’t give up just yet as Kansas deer hunting has some good news as well. The deer population in Kansas is suggested to be less than a half a million deer or less than 500,000 whitetail deer in Kansas. In Illinois the deer population is estimated to be over one and a half million whitetails or over 1,500,000. This means Kansas holds only 1/3 of the deer population that Illinois does. Thus the hunter will literally see 2/3 less the deer with us than if he were hunting in Illinois. This may mean 2/3 rds less fun if you like watching whitetail deer.

The good news is while hunters that seek out Kansas deer hunts need to know that even in the best of locations for Kansas deer hunting you are going to see many less deer. Therefore Kansas is not the State to select if you’re a whitetail hunter that gets bored easy, even in the best of locations. HOWEVER, Kansas and Iowa quite possibly house the biggest whitetail bucks in the Nation. Thus in conclusion in regard to what a whitetail deer hunter can expect on a deer hunt in Illinois or Missouri or Iowa is to see 25 to 50 deer per person per day. However if you are on a deer hunt in Kansas with us you may only see 9 to 20 deer per day, but in Kansas the bucks are carrying more bone on their head. Literally the Kansas bucks are fewer but larger in antler measurement. So as I mentioned in a prior article I wrote imagine your Kansas deer hunt wherein you are sitting in a tree stand and you aren’t seeing a lot of deer, you begin to wonder if you picked the right State to hunt this year, perhaps begin questioning the outfitter you chose to hunt with, or even the farm you are placed on. You begin to get somewhat bored and for all practical purposes are too enthused about your hunt when you catch movement out of the corner of your eye, and behold making its way towards you is a 180 plus whitetail buck. Now that’s Kansas deer hunting. A Kansas deer hunt should be an outing booked by hunters that don’t care how many deer they see, but rather are seeking the buck of a lifetime.

First know if your going to go on a Kansas deer hunt you must hit the Eastern to South Eastern portion of the State or just not go to Kansas at all. Then you need to be with a good Kansas deer outfitter like IMB Outfitters.

The main reason Kansas deer hunting produces the biggest whitetail deer in the World is because of past tagging regulations that has led to the allowance of longer life spans for Kansas whitetail deer. Prior to 2009 if any non resident whitetail deer hunter wanted to hunt deer in Kansas he or she had to involve themselves in a lottery process wherein it literally took years of waiting to get a tag. The only option or way around getting a Kansas deer tag to a non resident was for landowner to sell their deer tag to non residents which became a bit of a mess. This prevented non residents from accessing Kansas deer hunting. In short, just until about a year ago if you wanted to go on a Kansas deer hunt you had to either be involved in years of applications or pay a landowner big money for a landowner tag. However in 2007 recommendations were made to the Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks to change tag obtainment for non residents. Beginning in 2009 Kansas has allowed non residents to easily obtain both archery and firearms tags by simply applying for them in April. In fact for two years in a row all the tags haven’t even sold. Therefore now non residents can easily attend a Kansas deer hunt by buying a Kansas deer tag easily.

Here is the Kansas deer hunt report submitted in 2007 unto Kansas Wildlife and Parks if you are interested in the original recommendations, and to follow this report we will share how you obtain a Kansas deer tag currently.

The Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks presented a report on deer-related statute review to the Kansas Legislature Feb. 1 and 2. During the legislature’s 2005 session, the House Wildlife, Parks and Tourism Committee requested that the department review statutes and bring recommendations to simplify them. Last fall the Deer Task Force Committee, a 10-member group of department employees, was assembled to begin that process.

The Task Force began meeting in November, charged with reviewing not only deer-related statutes, but also regulations, permitting processes and management. The group soon discovered that it couldn’t change one aspect of the package without affecting two or three other areas. And it realized that with potential changes affecting so many hunters, landowners, and nonhunters, public input was necessary.

The Deer Task Force’s report to the legislature highlighted important issues and preliminary recommendations, but it requested that any final department recommendations for changes to deer-related statutes be delayed until the 2007 legislative session. The group has already begun receiving public input and plans to solicit more input before final recommendations are written. Below are the some the key points included in the report. To view the complete report, click on the link at the end of this summary.


Key issues which guided task force efforts include the following:
Permit allocation and distribution should be a function of the Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks, and opportunity to obtain permits should be fair and equitable. Comments from hunters, landowners and outfitters indicate an overwhelming dislike for the current transferable permit system.

The deer resource, especially mule deer in the west, must be conserved. Deer populations should be maintained within levels sustainable by the habitat and within tolerance levels of people for the damages and conflicts that deer may cause. Animal health issues must be addressed as they pertain to wild deer and captive cervid operations. Deer herd characteristics must be maintained within esthetic and quality standards desired by people.

Kansas’ deer hunting tradition must grow. The complexity and restriction of current permitting procedures and regulations have kept the Kansas deer hunting tradition from being what it could be.
Stakeholder input is necessary.
The permitting process and hunting regulations can be simplified.

Deer hunting opportunities can be improved.

Preliminary recommendations generated by the task force include the following:
Based on nonresident permit demand, it appears that unlimited Whitetail Either Sex firearms permits could be provided with minimal impact in eastern Kansas. If demand can be met for nonresident Whitetail Either Sex permits, transferable permits will be unnecessary. The current system forces landowners to depend on the luck of the draw, not knowing if they or their hunters will have permits. Outfitters must recruit landowners to apply for transferable nonresident permits, hoping to draw enough permits for their clients. And in some units, a secondary market has been created where permits may sell for thousands of dollars.


In western Kansas, where the resource is more limited, the task force favors a cap of 25 percent of firearms Whitetail Either Sex permits sold to residents the previous year made available to nonresidents. The recommendation is to issue them on a first come, first served basis.


To simplify the permit process and provide better hunting opportunities, the task force recommends reducing the number of deer management units for Whitetail Either Sex permits from 19 to 2 – an East Unit and a West Unit. This would make the process of applying for a permit easier and give hunters more freedom to explore new hunting areas. The current 19 DMUs would be retained for the distribution of whitetail antlerless permits and special harvest considerations.

Another way to simplify permits and provide more hunting opportunity is to establish a Whitetail Either Sex Any Season permit. This permit would allow the holder to hunt anywhere in either the east or west unit, during any season with the legal equipment. This has been a common request from hunters in recent years.

Re-establish a statewide Any-Deer (either species, either sex) Archery permit. This would be unlimited to residents and a cap of up to 25 percent of what was sold to residents the previous year would be available to nonresidents.

Establish two units for Any-Deer (either species, either sex) firearms and muzzleloader permits in western Kansas. These permits, which allow mule deer harvest, are available in limited numbers to residents. The task force recommends making a percentage of these permits available to nonresidents.


Allow members of a landowner’s immediate family to qualify for Hunt-Own-Land permits, regardless of their residence. Currently, all members of the immediate family residing in the home qualify, as long as at least 80 acres is owned for each family member purchasing a Hunt-Own-Land permit. Hunt-Own-Land permits may be transferred to lineal or collateral relatives, and about 900 of the 10,000 Hunt-Own-Land permits issued each year are transferred. However, law enforcement staff reports that it is nearly impossible to verify blood and collateral relatives. This change would be proposed to replace the transferable Hunt-Own-Land permit. It would allow a landowner/tenant’s children or parents to qualify for a hunt-own-land permit, whether they lived in the home or not, even if they were nonresidents. The task force also recommends that the definition of a landowner/tenant be strengthened to include examples of proof and a clause stating that when applicants sign the permit they agree to provide such proof on request.

In an attempt to make deer hunting more attractive to young hunters, the committee recommends half-price youth permits. This regulatory change was presented to the Kansas Wildlife and Parks Commission in January to consider for implementation during the 2006 season.

Another recommendation that addresses quality hunting opportunities is moving the muzzleloader season opener later. The special muzzleloader season has traditionally opened in early September (the 2006 season is proposed for Sept. 9-Sept. 22). Muzzleloader deer hunters have asked for a later opening day because hot weather, likely during the current date structure, makes the season unattractive. The task force proposes opening the deer seasons with a youth season the last Friday, Saturday and Sunday in September. This special season was established for hunters 16 and younger to hunt with adult supervision, as well as hunters with disabilities. It was specifically scheduled for September to avoid extreme and cold weather. Currently the archery season opens on Oct. 1. The committee recommends a concurrent opener for archery and muzzleloader hunters on the Monday following the youth and disabled hunters season. The muzzleloader season would continue for two weeks. The archery season would continue until December 31 as it currently does.

To maintain balanced age structure and quality deer, the task force recommends retaining the current one buck per hunter limit. It also favors keeping the current firearms season dates, which are after the peak of the deer breeding season.

CURRENT PROCESS TO OBTAIN A KANSAS DEER TAG
Nonresident deer permit applications accepted online from April 1-30, 2010. The nonresident draw results will be posted online June 1. Nonresident deer permits that are leftover after the draw will be sold online beginning June 15, first come first served. Oh yeah folks now it has become that simple.

Kansas deer hunts are limited to one of many choices for non residents which include the following:
Deer Season Dates for 2010:
Youth and Disability Season: Sept. 11- 19, 2010
Early Muzzleloader Season: Sept. 20 - Oct. 3, 2010
Archery Season: Sept. 20 - Dec. 31, 2010
Firearms Season: Dec. 1 - 12, 2010

Of course as we know the Kansas deer hunting is divided into different Units. Unit 11 is by far the strongest and is where IMB Outfitters runs hunts as seen at www.imbmonsterbucks.com

Kansas deer move across terrain in an odd manner. It seems no matter what State we run deer hunts in that each herd has evolved differently and moves across terrain differently. On a Kansas deer hunt you will think you need to be in the middle of a vast forest, and we do have many tracts of ground that hold vast amounts of timber. However Kansas deer tend to use hedgerows, fencelines, and the most obvious or dumbest of locations to use as travel routes. It’s simply how the Kansas whitetail deer has evolved. When you are on a Kansas deer hunt you are likely to find yourself in a location where you normally would never think you would want to sit out a day of deer hunting in Kansas. Effective tree stand placement by a Kansas deer outfitter should have you second guessing him if it is your first hunt in Kansas. But these odd locations are the very spots that hold some of the largest whitetail bucks in the entire Nation. While many will recognize that Kansas is a trophy whitetail deer state of a long standing reputation, many of the same do it yourself hunters come prepared to hunt large wood rather than the predominate whitetail habitat that is very prevalent throughout the state. In this case it is the hunter that must change as the trophy producing habitat will not adapt to the hunter. It was a non-resident hunter many years ago that thoroughly explained the cause for his lack of success is that Kansas deer hunting did not have enough trees for cover habitat. This first conversation many years ago led to the adage that hunters need to come to hunt trophy whitetail, not trees.

Kansas archery deer hunting starts in early October. Archery season continues to the firearms season that opens either the last Wednesday in November or first Wednesday in December and runs for 10 to 12 days. Archery season resumes after that until the end of December.
Kansas deer hunts and archery deer success - for Northern state (Minnesota, Michigan, Wisconsin, etc.) archery deer hunters have had the highest success rates during the late Kansas archery deer season in December. They seem to have the clothes to sit in the stand as well as the mental stamina to withstand the cold during this late deer season. Conversely, the southern state deer hunter seems to have a slight edge during the warmer Kansas October hunts as they seem to be more aware of rattling and grunting having more of that experience during their home state deer seasons. As spoken of before the entire State of Kansas does not offer great Kansas deer hunts. The wise whitetail hunter is quick to recognize that it’s Southeastern or Eastern Kansas in Unit 11 which is producing the biggest whitetail bucks.

Kansas firearms whitetail deer hunters may easily find the opportunity for out to 300 yard shooting and right down to 10 yards as well making a variable scope is the right answer.
Even with the rifle and scope deer hunting advantage the most common failing of the firearms Kansas whitetail deer hunter is the inability to judge range over open ground. The typical miss is to undershoot the deer. No small point and one we will reemphasize later and far more common to our Kansas whitetail deer hunting than that in Missouri or Iowa.

Kansas deer hunting is reknown for its muzzleloader whitetail deer season that is most underused season of all.
Muzzleloader hunters have a Kansas advantage of a double season one in late September into early October and another in December and both are available on the same tag.
The early Kansas deer hunting muzzleloader season is during the last two weeks when the bucks separate into bachelor groups, lazy and easily scouted and maneuvered in on. We literally have individual monster bucks patterned which continue to appear and feed in the same places each day.
Any bucks scouted during late July through September are likely to remain within the smallest areas that allows for undisturbed bedding, loafing, watering and browsing. The bucks are lazy, move later in the morning well into daylight, bed during the heat of the day and generally move again during evening daylight hours. This season is unique to Kansas giving the hunter one more variance to his hunts.
Kansas' regular firearms and muzzleloader December deer season allows the muzzleloader hunter to return for a second hunt with either a muzzleloader or modern rifle

I have seen portions of Kansas that without doubt look like western states with cactus and sagebrush. These are not the areas to book a Kansas deer hunt in. As aforementioned the rich soil and good agricultural areas which provide great food for big antlers is found on the Eastern side of the State in Unit 11.

It isn’t easy to determine just why Unit 11 of Kansas produces some of the biggest whitetail bucks in the world. Perhaps the most interesting pattern is the impact state management practices can have on entries. In Kansas, modern rifle season takes place after the rut. Also, the black powder season in Kansas is in mid-September, when the trees still wear leaves and temperatures are high. In contrast, many other States’s black powder season occurs in late October and early November, when temperatures are cool, bucks are starting to rut, and the leaves are falling. Since the majority of bucks killed are taken during gun seasons, timing those seasons so bucks are less vulnerable gives the animals time to mature. This may be THE reason Kansas deer hunts produce monster bucks.

Provided via Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks surrounding Kansas deer hunting include:

1. What Kansas deer hunting permits are available, and
how much are permit fees?

RESIDENTS
The following Kansas deer hunt permit must be obtained through online draw (application deadline midnight July 10, 2009); price includes $6.50 nonrefundable application fee; if unsuccessful in the draw, hunter
receives refund of permit fee and earns preference point for next year’s draw. (A 2.5 percent internet processing fee will be charged for all permits purchased or applied for online.)

• Kansas Resident Firearm Either-species/Either-sex Deer permit (whitetailed or mule deer buck, doe or fawn) – $37.50 for general resident; $22.50 for landowner/tenant; $22.50 for youth.
Firearm Either-species/Either-sex Deer permits are valid either in the West Zone, which includes Deer Management Units 1, 2, 17, and 18, OR in the East Zone, which includes Deer management Units 3, 4, 5, 7, and 16, during the regular firearm season (Dec. 2-13) using any legal equipment.

• Kansas deer hunt Preference Point for next year’s draw – $6.50 Permits available over-the-counter, July 15 – Dec 30.

• Kansas deer hunt Resident Any-Season White-tailed Deer permit (white-tailed deer buck, doe or fawn) – $32.50 for general resident; $17.50 for landowner/tenant; $17.50 for youth 15 and younger. Resident Any-season White-tailed Deer permits are valid statewide in any season with equipment legal for that season.

• Kansas deer hunt Resident Archery Either-species/Either-sex Deer permit (whitetailed or mule deer buck, doe or fawn) ¬– $32.50 for general resident; $17.50 for landowner/tenant; $17.50 for youth 15 and younger. Resident Archery Either-species/Either-sex Deer permits are valid statewide with archery equipment only, during archery season (Sept. 21-Dec. 31).

• Resident Muzzleloader Either-species/Either-sex Deer permit (whitetailed or mule deer buck, doe or fawn) – $32.50 for general resident; $17.50 for landowner/tenant; $17.50 for youth 15 and younger. Muzzleloader Either-species/Either-sex Deer permits are valid either in the West Zone, which includes Deer Management Units 1, 2, 17, and 18, OR in the East Zone ,which includes
Deer Management Units 3, 4, 5, 7, and 16, during the early muzzleloader season (Sept. 21-Oct.4) and the regular firearm season (Dec. 2-13) using muzzleloading equipment only. • Resident Hunt-Own-Land Deer permit (white-tailed or mule deer buck, doe or fawn) – $17.50 Hunt-Own-Land permits are valid for any season with equipment legal for that season, and only on lands owned or operated for agricultural purposes. This permit is available to individuals who qualify as resident landowners or as tenants, or as family members living with the landowner or tenant. Evidence of tenancy, if requested, shall be provided to the department and may include, but is not limited to, Natural Resource Conservation Service records, Farm Service Records, or written agricultural contract or lease documentation. Permits are limited to one per person per 80 acres owned or operated. This permit is not transferable. Use of this permit does not require a Kansas
hunting license.

• Special (relative) Hunt-Own-Land Deer permit (white-tailed or mule deer buck, doe or fawn) – $32.50 This permit may be issued to a resident landowner’s or tenant’s siblings and lineal ascendants or descendants, and their spouses, whether or not a Kansas resident. (For example,
a grandson and his wife, a daughter and her husband, a parent, or a brother and his wife would be eligible for this permit. A landowner’s or tenant’s uncle, aunt, nephew, niece, or cousin would not be eligible for this permit.) The permit is valid only on lands owned or operated by the landowner or tenant, and may be used in any season with equipment legal for that season. Permits are limited to one per 80 acres owned or operated. This permit is not transferable. Use of this permit requires a Kansas hunting license unless exempt by Kansas law. Resident Antlerless permits available over-the-counter, July 15 – Jan 30, 2010; hunters must possess a permit that allows the harvest of an antlered deer before they can purchase either type of antlerless deer permit until Dec. 30. During extended antlerless whitetail seasons, hunters may purchase antlerless permits without first purchasing an antlered permit.

• Kansas deer hunt Resident Antlerless White-tailed Deer permit (any white-tailed deer without a visible antler) – $17.50 for general resident; $10 for youth 15 and younger. The first antlerless permit purchased will be valid statewide on all lands (department lands, WIHA, private lands with landowner permission); the second whitetail antlerless permit purchased will be valid on WIHA and private lands in units 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 19, and on Cedar Bluff Wildlife Area; the third through fifth whitetail antlerless permits are valid on private lands and Walk-In hunt areas in units 7, 8, 10A, 12, 13, 15, 16, and 19. All deer hunters are required to have a deer permit that allows them to take an antlered deer before they may acquire an antlerless-only permit. (After Dec. 30, hunters may purchase antlerless permits without first purchasing an antlered permit.) All Antlerless White-tailed Deer permits are valid during any season with
equipment legal for that season. Permits may be purchased over-the-counter July 13-January 30, 2010.

• Kansas deer hunt Resident Antlerless Either-species Deer permit (any white-tailed or mule deer without a visible antler) – $17.50 for general resident; $10 for youth 15 and younger. On sale Aug. 1. Antlerless Either-species Deer permits are valid for any antlerless white-tailed or mule deer in Deer Management Unit 3 only, during any season with equipment legal for that season. Permits are limited and available on a firstcome, first-served basis. All deer hunters will be required to have a deer permit that allows them to take an antlered deer before they may acquire an antlerless-only permit.

NONRESIDENTS KANSAS DEER HUNTING PERMITS

Permits available through online draw (NEW FOR 2010: application deadline April 30.) A 2.5 percent internet processing fee will be charged for all permits purchased or applied for online.
• Kansas deer hunt Nonresident White-tailed Deer permit (white-tailed deer buck, doe or fawn) – $322.50
Hunter applies in one deer management unit and selects one adjacent unit in which to also hunt. Hunters also select one equipment type and season choice (archery, muzzleloader,
or firearm) at the time of application.

Kansas deer hunt Muzzleloader permit holders may hunt during early muzzleloader season and regular firearm season using muzzleloader equipment only. If unsuccessful in the draw, hunter receives a $301 refund and a preference point for next year’s draw. A nonresident who successfully draws
an archery or muzzleloader White-tailed Deer permit in Unit 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 16, 17, or 18 may also apply for one of a limited number of Mule Deer Stamps for an additional fee of $102.50 submitted at time of application; if drawn, the applicant’s archery or muzzleloader whitetail
permit converts to an either-species/either-sex archery or muzzleloader permit. Preference points do not count toward this stamp. If unsuccessful in the Mule Deer Stamp draw, hunter will receive a $101 refund and be issued the whitetail permit.

• Kansas deer hunt Preference Point – $21.50
A nonresident hunter who didn't want to hunt in 2009 had the option of purchasing a preference point that will count toward a Nonresident White-tailed Deer permit in a future drawing.
Nonresident permits available over-the-counter, July 15 – Dec 30.

• Kansas deer hunt Nonresident Hunt-Own-Land Deer permit (white-tailed or mule deer buck, doe or fawn) – $77.50 Hunt-Own-Land permits are valid during all seasons with equipment legal for that season, and only on lands owned or operated for agricultural purposes. Only those individuals
listed on the property deed are eligible. Use of this permit does not require a Kansas hunting license. Nonresident antlerless permits available over-the-counter, July 15 – Jan. 30, 2010; hunter must possess a permit that allows the harvest of an antlered deer before purchasing either type of antlerless deer permit.

• Kansas deer hunt Nonresident Antlerless White-tailed Deer permit (any whitetailed deer without a visible antler) – $77.50 The first Antlerless White-tailed Deer permit purchased will be valid statewide, including all KDWP-managed public hunting areas. Any additional such permits issued to the same individual will be valid only in designated deer management units on private lands (with permission of landowner), Walk-In Hunting Areas, and designated department lands. All Antlerless White-tailed Deer permits are valid during any season with equipment legal for that
season. Permits may be purchased over-the-counter July 13 – Jan. 30, 2010.

• Kansas deer hunt Nonresident Antlerless Either-species Deer permit (any whitetailed or mule deer without a visible antler) – $ 77.50. On sale Aug. 1. This is a limited permit available only in Deer Management

Unit 3. It is available on a first-come, first-served basis.

2. When are Kansas deer hunting seasons?

Youth and Disability: September 12-20
Early Muzzleloader: September 21-October 4
Archery: September 21-December 31
Early Firearm (DMU 19 ONLY): October 10-18
Regular Firearm: December 2-13
Extended White-tailed Antlerless-Only: January 1-10, 2010
Extended Archery (DMU 19 ONLY): January 4-31, 2010
Special Extended White-tailed Antlerless Only
(DMU 7, 8, & 15): January 11-17, 2010

3. Which permits must be applied for in the online draw for Kansas deer hunting?
• Kansas deer hunt Resident Firearm Either-species/Either-sex Deer permit
• Kansas deer hunt Nonresident White-tailed Deer permit/Mule Deer Stamp.

4. When are application deadlines?
• Nonresident White-tailed Deer permit (archery, muzzleloader,
firearm) and Mule Deer Stamp – midnight, June 1, 2009. April 30 in 2010.
• Resident Firearm Either-species/Either-sex Deer permit – midnight,
July 10, 2009.

5. How many permits that allow the harvest of an antlered deer may a hunter receive?
Only one. No hunter may legally harvest more than one antlered deer per year.

6. How many nonresident permits are authorized in Kansas for the 2009 deer season?
A formula determines the total number of nonresident deer permits issued annually, based on hunter demand, landowner preferences, and established biological adjustments. This year’s allotment is listed below:

Deer Whitetail Deer
Management Either Sex Mule Deer
Unit Permits Stamps
1 671 50
2 385 40
3 777 44
4 406 14
5 531 14
6 512
7 1,367 14
8 2,129
9 1,023
10 1,305
11 3,194
12 2,056
13 615
14 1,750
15 1,325
16 2,108 30
17 479 50
18 276 30

There were leftover permits in all units after the draw, which are being sold on a first-come, first-served basis. Click here for more information.

7. What do I need to know about Kansas deer hunt antlerless deer permits?

All hunters must first possess a permit that allows harvest of an antlered deer before any type of antlerless permit can be purchased, unless antlerless permit is purchased after Dec. 30. All antlerless deer permits may be purchased over-the-counter from July 15 through January
30, 2010, regardless of residency.

The first Kansas deer hunt antlerless permit purchased will be valid statewide on all lands (department lands, WIHA, private lands with landowner permission);the second whitetail antlerless permit purchased will be valid on WIHA and private lands in units 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 19, and on Cedar Bluff Wildlife Area; the third through fifth whitetail antlerless permit will be valid on private lands and walk-in hunt areas in units 7, 8, 10A, 12, 13, 15, 16, and 19. All deer hunters will be required to have a deer permit that allows them to take an antlered deer before they may acquire an antlerless-only permit. All Antlerless White-tailed Deer permits for your Kansas deer hunt are valid during any season with equipment legal for that season. Permits may be purchased over-the-counter July 15-January 30, 2010. Antlerless Either-species Deer permits, valid for both white-tailed and mule deer, are available on a limited basis in Deer Management Unit 3
only. On sale Aug. 1.


8. How many deer permits can a resident receive?
As many as seven, as listed below:
• One antlered deer permit.
• As many as five Antlerless White-tailed Deer permits.
• One Antlerless Either-species Deer permit for Unit 3 only.

9. How many Kansas deer hunting permits can a nonresident receive?

Up to seven, as listed below:
• One nonresident antlered deer permit.
• As many as five Nonresident Antlerless White-tailed Deer permits.
• One Nonresident Antlerless Either-species Deer permit for Unit 3 only. 10. Who may hunt in Deer Management Unit (DMU) 19? The following individuals may hunt in DMU 19:
• Resident Any-season White-tailed Deer permit holders during any open deer season with equipment legal for that season. If permit is not filled during regular seasons, it may be used in DMU 19 during the January 1-10 extended season for antlerless whitetails only, with equipment legal during a firearm season, as well as the Jan. 4-31 extended archery season for antlerless whitetails with archery equipment only.
• Resident and nonresident Archery permit holders during the regular archery season. If permit is not filled during regular archery season, it may be used in DMU 19 during the January 1-10 extended season for antlerless whitetails only with equipment legal during a firearm season, and the special January 4-31 extended archery season for antlerless whitetails with archery
equipment only.
• Nonresident firearm or muzzleloader permit holders for adjacent units 9, 10, 11, and 14.
• Resident and Nonresident Hunt-Own-Land permit holders for land in Unit 19.
• Holders of Antlerless White-tailed Deer permits during any
deer season with equipment legal for that season.


11. What is the definition of a landowner or tenant?

Landowner – A resident owner of farm or ranch land of 80 acres or more located in the state of Kansas.

Tenant – An individual resident or nonresident who is actively engaged
in the agricultural operation of 80 acres or more of Kansas farm or ranch land for the purpose of producing agricultural commodities or livestock and who (A) has a substantial financial investment in the production of agricultural commodities or livestock on such farm or ranch land and the potential to realize substantial financial benefit from such production; or (B) is a bona fide manager having an overall responsibility to direct, supervise, and conduct such agricultural operation and has the potential to realize substantial benefit from such production in the form of salary, shares of such production, or some other economic incentive based upon such production.
Evidence of tenancy, if requested, shall be provided to the department and may include, but is not limited to, Natural Resource Conservation Services records, Farm Service Agency records, or written agricultural contract or lease documentation.

Nonresident Landowner — A nonresident owner of at least 80 acres or more of Kansas farm or ranch land. Nonresident Hunt-Own-Land permits are restricted to the landowner’s property.

12. Can my nonresident family members obtain permits just to hunt on my Kansas deer hunt land?

Yes, if you are a resident landowner. Although Hunt-Own-Land permits are no longer transferable to relatives, Special Hunt-Own-Land Deer permits are available to a resident landowner’s or tenant’s siblings and lineal family members and their spouses, regardless of residency — one permit per 80 acres owned or operated. A nonresident hunting license is required.

13. Do resident archery hunters have to designate hunting units for a Kansas deer hunt?

No. Resident archery permits will be valid statewide for white-tailed or mule deer, either sex.
14. Do nonresident hunters have to designate hunting units? Yes. All nonresident hunters must select a deer management unit, and they may select one adjacent unit. They must select the equipment type (archery, muzzleloader, or firearm) and season choice at the time of application. A nonresident archery permit is valid only during archery season; a nonresident firearm permit is valid only during regular firearm season; and a nonresident muzzleloader permit is valid during early muzzleloader season and regular firearm season using muzzleloader equipment only.

15. What is a Mule Deer Stamp?

Nonresidents who draw an archery or muzzleloader Nonresident Whitetailed Deer permit in designated units may apply for one of a limited number of Mule Deer Stamps. If drawn, the applicant’s white-tailed permit converts to an either-species/either-sex permit, which allows harvest of a white-tailed or mule deer buck, doe, or fawn. Mule Deer Stamps are available in limited numbers and only in designated deer management units (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 16, 17, and 18.) The stamp costs $102.50.

16. Will my nonresident preference point count for the Mule Deer Stamp draw?

No. The preference point counts only for the Nonresident White-tailed Deer permit draw. The Mule Deer Stamp draw is random and not based on preference points.

17. How will my deer permit differ from last year?

Units 4 and 5 have been added to the Extended Firearm White-tailed Antlerless-only season, January 1-10, 2010. A Special Extended Firearm White-tailed Antlerless-only season — January
11-17, 2010 — will include units 7, 8, and 15 only.

18. Archery seasons overlaps with muzzleloader and firearm seasons in 2009. Must archers wear blaze orange? Yes, archery hunters who hunt during periods that coincide with any muzzleloader or firearm season must wear blaze orange. The law requires that all deer hunters afield during open firearm seasons must wear a blaze orange hat and at least 200 inches of blaze orange. Archers are not required to wear blaze orange when muzzleloader or firearm seasons are closed.

19. What are the rules for the extended Kansas deer hunt firearm seasons?

Unit restrictions on the permit remain in effect. Any unfilled 2009 deer permit valid in Units 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, and 19 may be used during the extended white-tailed antlerless-only season in the two management units listed on the permit. In addition, a Special Extended Firearm White-tailed Antlerless-only season — January 11-17, 2010 — has been added for units 7, 8, and 15 only. Only antlerless white-tailed deer may be taken. Any equipment legal for use during a firearm season may be used during the extended season. Blaze orange clothing is required of all hunters during this season. A 2010 Kansas hunting license is required unless exempt by Kansas law.
CHEYENNE
DECATUR
SHERIDAN
GOVE
SHERMAN THOMAS
RAWLINS
NORTON
GRAHAM
TREGO
ROOKS
ELLIS
WALLACE LOGAN
PHILLIPS SMITH
RUSSELL
OSBORNE
RUSH
OTTAWA
ELLSWORTH
LINCOLN
MITCHELL
CLOUD
JEWELL REPUBLIC WASHINGTON
CLAY
DICKINSON
SALINE GEARY
WABAUNSEE
POTTAWATOMIE
NEMAHA
MARSHALL
RILEY
JEFFERSON
JACKSON
ATCHISON
DONIPHAN
BROWN
DOUGLAS JOHNSON
SHAWNEE
LEAVENWORTH
MORRIS
WYANDOTTE
WICHITA SCOTT
HAMILTON
GREELEY
EDWARDS
KIOWA
LANE NESS
KEARNY FINNEY
MORTON
MEADE
GRAY
SEWARD
HASKELL
STANTON
STEVENS
CLARK COMANCHE
GRANT
PAWNEE
HODGEMAN
FORD
BARTON
PRATT
BARBER
STAFFORD
RICE
COWLEY
SEDGWICK
HARVEY
BUTLER
CHASE
McPHERSON
RENO
KINGMAN
HARPER
SUMNER
MARION
LYON
ELK
GREENWOOD
CHAUTAUQUA
BOURBON
CRAWFORD
NEOSHO
WILSON
MONTGOMERY
LABETTE CHEROKEE
MIAMI
WOODSON
ALLEN
COFFEY ANDERSON LINN
FRANKLIN
OSAGE
70
70
70
4
4
14
14
8
15
15
47
42 53
144 99
147
179
96
4
81
36
81
54
56
50
77
77
50
54
75
75
283
183
281
283
283
283
160
281
156 183
169
77
24
83
160
UNIT 1
UNIT 2
UNIT 17
UNIT 18 UNIT 16
UNIT 5
UNIT 4
UNIT 3 UNIT 7 UNIT 8 UNIT 9
UNIT 6
UNIT 14
UNIT 15
UNIT 12
UNIT 13
UNIT 11
UNIT
10
UNIT 19


20. Can I hunt with a crossbow during the 2009 Kansas deer hunt deer season?

Yes, but only with a firearm permit or in other situations where legal equipment for firearm season applies (such as during the extended white-tailed antlerless-only season.) Crossbows are NOT legal equipment for use during archery or muzzleloader seasons. Legal crossbows
must have draw weights of at least 125 pounds, with bolts at least 16 inches long, equipped with broadhead points that cannot pass through a ring 13/16” diameter.

Exception: Disabled persons in possession of an archery permit may use crossbows or locking draws while hunting deer, as permitted under KAR 115-18-7, by application and special permit only.

21. Can I use an optical scope on my muzzleloader during the early muzzleloader season Kansas deer hunt?

Yes. Optical scopes, open sights, peep sights, and fiber optic sights that do not project visible light or electronically amplify visible or infrared light are legal for all muzzleloader hunting in Kansas.

22. May I carry an archery or muzzleloader permit when I hunt with a firearm using my Antlerless White-tailed Deer permit during the firearm season?

No. You are restricted to the equipment of the most limited permit in your possession. If you wish to hunt with a firearm for antlerless white-tailed deer, you must remove from your possession any restricted permit, such as an archery permit or muzzleloader permit, before you go afield. You are also restricted on the equipment you may have in your possession. For example, field points are not legal equipment to use while archery deer hunting. You carry only broadhead arrows while bowhunting.

23. What are the rules for the special extended Kansas deer hunt firearm season in units 7, 8, and 15?

Dates for the season are Jan. 11-17, 2010. Any unfilled 2009 deer permit valid in these units may be used during this special extended season. Any legal equipment may be used to take a white-tailed deer without a visible antler plainly protruding from its skull during this season. A 2010 hunting license is required, unless exempt by Kansas law. Hunter orange clothing is required.

KANSAS DEER OUTFITTERS

Due to Kansas being such a fragile State in regard to just where the abundance of trophy bucks are located one must look to Eastern Kansas to score big with a Kansas deer outfitter. Don’t let anyone outside this area tell you anything less. As aforementioned the biggest whitetails in Kansas roam the most fertile soiled ground laying in the Eastern portion of the State. It is in this location you need to seek a Kansas deer outfitter. Some Kansas deer outfitters will try and entice you into a Western Kansas deer hunt by saying they have multiple species of animals, but beware as you will want to deer hunt with a Kansas outfitter that specializes only in whitetails. Unit 11 should be your target area. It is here that IMB Outfitters provides both fully and semi guided deer hunts. Without question IMB Outfitters will be your best bet for the selection of a Kansas whitetail deer outfitter.


THE BIGGEST WHITETAIL BUCKS KILLED IN KANSAS INCLUDE:

Note that out of the top 20 deer ever killed in the United States that 7 of them have came from the state of Kansas.

KEN CARTWRIGHT BUCK the result of a Kansas deer hunt


Scoring 250 6/8 inches non typical this archery harvest in 1992 is without question one of the greatest whitetail bucks taken from the State of Kansas.

KENNY FOWLER BUCK the result of a Kansas deer hunt

Scoring 257 inches non typical harvested in 1988 the Kenny Fowler buck is a true example of just how beautiful a non typical Kansas whitetail deer can be. Fowler had watched this particular buck throughout the preseason summer. Kenny’s buck took a lung shot and crossed a river 60 yards from his tree stand. Needless to say Kenny jumped into the river and retrieved the deer. This buck was taken in early October.

DALE LARSON BUCK the result of a Kansas deer hunt

This buck score 264 5/8 inches.

As I was listening to the raindrops play their rhythm on the fallen leaves, I noticed the flick of a tail and glimpsed a deer’s antler. The buck was about 90 yards distant, walking along a brushy fence line — traveling perpendicular and away from my position. My view of the thicket was obscured by scattered trees and brush, making it impossible to maintain visual contact.

I retrieved my grunt call from my rain gear and blew a couple of low, tending grunts. At that moment, the buck was entering a dogwood thicket. I couldn’t see his response, so I called again with more gusto, but I still couldn’t see him.
Thinking that any more volume might blow him out of the country, I decided to call it quits. As I was putting the call away inside my rain suit, I caught sight of movement 25 yards in front of me. I saw immediately that it was “Dagger,” and he was coming on a dead run.

I was introduced to archery at the early age of 8, although I did not start hunting whitetails until 12 years later. After 10 years of it, I began targeting only mature bucks.

Bowhunting has been a major part of my life. My wife, Connie, is also an experienced bowhunter, and my stepson, Matt, is fast becoming one. Our devotion to whitetails is a yearlong endeavor. We manage for quality, do a lot of off-season scouting, engage in shed hunting, recreational viewing of wildlife and actual hunting. In fact, one of the keys to our success is year ‘round involvement.

The majority of our hunting area is tall grass prairie, wooded drainages and small cultivated fields. Our woodlands consist of several species of hard and soft woods that spread up the drainages and out into the grasslands like fingers on your hand. The small amount of cropland is spread between the upland and bottomland, giving the land a mosaic pattern with an abundance of edge habitat.

We’d come to call one of the best bucks inhabiting the tract “Dagger” because of a drop tine on his left main beam that grew down and backward. We first saw him when he was 3½ years old, when he was otherwise a mainframe 10-pointer. He continued to carry the drop tine throughout his lifetime. The next year, his rack carried only nine points, but went back to 10 before eventually growing a 12-point frame.

I had wanted to film Dagger’s antler development during the summer of 1998, but my star was playing hard to get. I had some bad thoughts of Dagger succumbing to hemorrhagic disease, which had plagued the local deer herd. I was having a hard time staying optimistic, although we found his previous year’s sheds, but at least we knew he had survived that long.
The first sighting of Dagger last year occurred when Connie and I were going to vote. It was almost dark when my wife spotted a large deer in the pasture. I tried to identify the deer through my binoculars, but with the light conditions and quick sighting, I wasn’t sure. What I could see was that the deer had a huge typical frame with a long drop tine on the left beam. If it wasn’t Dagger, he was still a keeper.

The second time I saw him was with my stepson, Matt. It was also near dark, about one mile from the previous sighting. Just as before, the encounter was brief, but encouraging. He was still alive!

Although I knew better from previous calling experiences to be ready for action, I was not prepared for the deer’s fast and aggressive response. The buck ran directly under my stand and stopped. He stood there turning his head first one way, then another, trying to locate the vocal intruder. Standing 12 feet below me was Dagger — the buck of a lifetime — and my bow was still hanging on its hanger.

While I was pondering my next move, Dagger started walking toward the edge to look downhill. Thinking it was “now or never,” I put my hand in the bow sling, removed the weapon from the hanger, stepped back and drew — all in one slow and deliberate motion. I fully expected to see him looking up at me when I got settled in my stance, but he had continued to slowly walk away from me.
I positioned my 20-yard pin behind his right shoulder and let instinct take over, sending the arrow to its mark. At the impact, Dagger lunged forward and ran downhill and out of sight. I could hear his retreat for a few seconds, and then all was quiet.

After waiting about 30 minutes, I headed back to meet my hunting partner, Perry, at the truck. We both arrived at about the same time. I told him that I had shot Dagger and I didn’t think he went very far.

We drove back to the house to pick up flashlights, my wife and stepson. Because of the light rain, we decided to start the tracking job sooner rather than later. Upon reaching the site of the shot, we found the lower half of my arrow lying beyond where the deer had been standing. The blood trail started immediately, and his staggering tracks were easy to follow. We had gone between 70 and 80 yards when we saw his antlers in the flashlight’s beam.

This magnificent 6½-year-old animal was something to behold. He had fallen in such a way that his long drop tine held up his head. At this position, you could see all the kickers, stickers and his huge typical frame. Everyone there had dreamt of harvesting this deer, and most had enjoyed (or not enjoyed) an opportunity. We were all amazed at his size and did nothing but admire him for quite some time.

JAMIE REMMERS BUCK the result of a Kansas deer hunt


This Kansas buck scored 257 1/8 inches.

"Grab your shoes and coat," my husband, Kent, yelled as he came running into the house. "You’ve got to see this buck!"
So there I was, in my shoes, coat and pajamas, looking at a magnificent animal through a pair of binoculars. About half a dozen brief encounters like that, during the rut, are all we can expect. By the time rifle season rolls around, the big ones seem to disappear.

Little did I know that within the month, I’d be watching that buck again, only through my rifle’s scope.
Kent and I and my two children, Torey and Katie, live in rural Marion County, Kan. He ranches and shoes horses, and I teach preschool in the mornings and work at my folks’ lumberyard in the afternoons. I won’t profess to be any type of deer hunting expert, but I have been fortunate to learn how to hunt from some very patient mentors.

During my first deer hunt in 1982, I took a small 8-pointer. And I’ve pretty much looked forward to and hunted every season since. In 1986, I hunted while I was pregnant with my son. And this year, I was going to get to repeat that experience.

Believe me: You haven’t truly been challenged until you try to hunt in overalls that won’t zip up, coats that barely close and boots you can’t reach. Plus, you have to adapt to a new form of walking called "waddling." I’m sure that to another hunter, or even the deer for that matter, it’s a real sight!

With deer season ’97 fast approaching, I borrowed my dad’s Remington in hopes that maybe this would be the year I’d get a buck nice enough to hang on the wall.

Sunday, Dec. 7, began with a forecast of freezing rain turning to snow. By noon, however, it hadn’t come to pass. Kent and his hunting buddy, Jeff Riffel, stopped at the house for a quick lunch. The guys rehashed their morning hunt and eventually came to the conclusion that it was time I got out to do a little hunting, too.

We came up with a plan that had me blocking a spot back behind our house, while the guys walked out a small wooded creek area. If there was anything in there, we figured it would go one of two directions: along the field or behind the dam of our pond. Either way, the trails converge past a spot where I would be waiting with a .270.

Since we hadn’t heard of many deer being taken yet, Kent’s last words were to "shoot anything decent if it comes out." Little did I know!

I crossed the pond dam, picked a spot where I would have a clear shot of the two trails, and the hunt began.
I’ll admit that about then I was feeling the pressure because I knew these guys were doing this strictly for my gain, and I didn’t want to let them down. Minutes after their walk began, I spotted a couple of does and a small buck pop out of the trees to my right. They were about 400 yards out across a field and just as my senses were going on full alert, they disappeared back into the trees.

Almost as quickly as they went in, two or three more bucks came out. I spun sideways, shouldered my rifle and began deciding which one I was going to keep my eye on. No sooner had I lowered the rifle, "he" stepped out from the trees. I remember thinking, "Who needs a scope to know this is the one!"

It looked like a giant rack floating my way, and I almost panicked. I hoped I’d chosen the right place to be because he was about 300 yards north of me and there were a lot of paths — too many — he might take.
As the deer fled back into the safety of the trees, I was worried that I’d lose sight of him. But it didn’t take long for me to realize that, even in the dense brush, I could easily focus on that massive rack!

I had my scope on him and continued to keep turning with him as he worked his way south. Somewhere near 100 yards, he chose to take the "high road" out along the edge of the field, while the rest of the herd took the "low road" that would eventually lead them behind the pond.

He continued on the course he’d set and soon crossed underneath our old abandoned treestand. Finally, he was where I wanted him, but I was shaking so much that the crosshairs were moving from one end of that buck to the other. With each pounding heartbeat, my scope bounced from his back to his belly.

I knew that would be my one chance of a lifetime, and it was time to get a grip. I put the crosshairs just behind his front leg and slowly squeezed the trigger.

As the shot rang out, the buck wheeled around, but then crumpled to the ground. I hurried over to him as quickly as I could, but getting high centered on a barb-wire fence tends to slow one down considerably.

When I reached the buck and allowed myself to finally focus on that huge rack, my legs started shaking and my heart started pounding all over again. Actually, I don’t think they quit for about three days afterward!
My shot hit him in the neck — in front of his leg instead of behind – but I was proud of the fact that I’d waited patiently for the right opportunity and had brought him down with one clean shot.

As I was standing there admiring the 34-point monster, I heard a commotion in the trees below me. Six bucks were passing by, single file, starting with a really nice 10-pointer and working down to a little 4-pointer. It was odd, but I felt like I was watching them as they paid a final tribute to their fallen leader.

I turned around and does were milling around only a few yards from where I stood. Perhaps only a woman might admit this, but in that mixed-up scene, I even started feeling a little guilty for causing such a disruption to their way of life. Eventually, they moved on and the spell was broken.
I didn’t know whether to scream, dance or play it cool.

Just to be ornery to my compadres in the creek, I decided to play it cool and act as if I didn’t have one down. When I saw their orange clothing finally coming through the trees, I wanted to walk ahead to meet them, but I kept imagining that it would be my luck to come back and the buck would be gone!

I finally tore myself far enough away to where I could keep an eye on the buck, but they wouldn’t see him right away. When the guys got closer, I said, "I’m sure I hit one, but he turned and headed back down the creek."
I had to turn my head away from them to hide the grin. They immediately began looking for signs to trail him. I can only imagine what they were thinking at that moment, but it took them only a few more steps forward to realize they’d been had.

Since the popular song came out, my kids have been teasing me each year to get "Da Turdy-Point Buck." All I wanted to do was get hold of the kids and say, "Guess what I got, guys?"

JERRY HAMPTON BUCK the result of a Kansas deer hunt

226 4/8 Non-Typical
This Kansas trophy boasts 22 points and exceptional mass. Harvested in 1988, this giant has huge base circumferences of 6 6/8 and 6 7/8 and its brow tines are unbelievable.

GARY SMITH BUCK the result of a Kansas deer hunt


227 0/8 Non-Typical
This buck has been called the "Palmated Monster" of Kansas. World-class whitetails come in a variety of shapes, but few ever will match this web antlered brute for overall mass. This midwest giant was harvested in 1970.

JOSEPH WATER BUCK the result of a Kansas deer hunt
A buck taken by Joseph Waters in 1987 ranks as the No. 12 nontypical deer ever taken in North America. Four other Kansas bucks rank in the top 50.



Darrin Bradley

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