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Ohio Deer Outfitters
 

Ohio Deer Outfitters

When I began :nosing; around to look at other deer outfitters in Ohio I did not find too much competition. In fact most of the landowners were not fond of the idea of outfitting. Therefore as I searched the internet for ohio deer outfitters I did not find very many in the correct location to kill monster bucks. Lets take a look at the three counties IMB Outfitters run・s ohio deer hunts from. The biggest bucks in Ohio history rank as some of the biggest on earth. They include Mike Beatty's monster non-typical from 2000, the world's top deer ever shot by a bowhunter. That giant came from western Ohio, which has come on strong in recent years.

I was mortified as I looked online and saw most of the Ohio deer outfitters advertising that they were in the :Golden Triangle; of Ohio when the truth is they were not. Oh how I wish I could name the other Ohio deer outfitters that are claiming to be in the Golden Triangle in their advertisement that are not. The Golden Triangle of Ohio deer hunts is in the counties or general area of Coshocton, Guernsey, Tuscarawas, and Licking County. Don・t be fooled by any other as this is proven by a map on our website with information taken from Ohio Department of Natural Resources for verification purposes.

We are located in the Coshocton, Guernsey, and Tuscarawas Counties. These counties are reknown for their deer populations and their ability to produce monster whitetail bucks on a consistent basis. Coshocton County, Ohio harvested 9635 deer last year. Tuscarawas County harvested 9009 deer last year. Guernsey County, Ohio harvested 8289 last year. No other county but Licking County, Ohio harvested more deer and Licking County, Ohio ranked #3 out of the top 4. (By the way these 4 Counties are the highest populated and encompass the Golden Triangle within Ohio deer hunting.)

So were are the Ohio deer outfitters? I don・t know. The community is a tight knit scenario and not easily penetrated. While I・m not trying to convert you, all I can say is I have to give God the glory on this endeavor as what seemed impossible to pull off has occurred. IMB has struck oil in Ohio and will begin running Ohio deer hunts in 2011 as an Ohio deer outfitter while continuing to run hunts as well in Iowa, Illinois, Missouri, and Kansas too.

Geographically speaking, the State of Ohio is a lot less of a drive for the East Coast whitetail deer hunter. Thus we are trying to make things easier for the boys out East that wanna take down a monster. I must say, (and I・m sure I・ll get some ugly emails as a result of this statement) that I was not impressed at all with other Ohio deer outfitters. It as if the State just got started with whitetail outfitting and nobody is well established that we could discover. As you know IMB Outfitters has been in business for 13 years and brings a ton of experience to the table for your Ohio deer hunt. Don・t skimp to save a couple hundred dollars and end up disappointed. Hunt with the best Ohio whitetail deer outfitting service, IMB Outfitters. In fact we have won more outdoor awards than any other outfitter in America. Ohio deer hunting will be one of two things. #1. The greatest experience you・ve ever had in your life. Or #2. Hunting hill country bucks with no crops and wondering why your not on big bucks.

Just this year I had to part ways with an employee that had worked here for years. Things simply were not working out between him and I. I still like him but he was sent to look for work elsewhere. He made a couple trips to Ohio and called me. He asked for his job back and claimed Ohio deer hunting was awful. Well he had exposed himself to the counties in Ohio that were not in the Golden Triangle which include Coshocton, Guernsey, and Tuscarawas Counties. He was reporting accurately of the area he had seen but hadn・t done his research on what area to look at. He had been looking at the wrong area. To give you an idea of how area sensitive Ohio deer hunts can be just know that only 6 out of over 89 counties in Ohio produced over 7000 deer harvests last year. All 6 of these Counties for Ohio deer hunts border one another. Oh yeah you have to get in the Golden Triangle or simply forget it.

The top five states in the nation which are responsible for the most bucks in the record books include Illinois, Iowa, Ohio, Wisconsin, and Kansas. Finding a good whitetail deer outfitter in Ohio can be quite the task. Although IMB Outfitters has been in business for 13 years, we have literally sought out Ohio ground for over 5 years now. As an outfitter I simply will not lease ground unless its awesome. I have watched many outfitters lease hunting ground that was average just so they could have somewhere to run hunters. Our policy is that if we can・t get the best ground then we simply won・t lease it. After several years of research and development IMB Outfitters is proud to announce we have leased ground in Ohio with accommodations that are awesome on the best land tracts in Ohio. If your looking for a great Ohio deer outfitter then look no further than IMB Outfitters. This aint no advertisement, it・s the truth with a great story behind how it happened that IMB would become a Ohio whitetail deer outfitter.

Prior to beginning the story let me give you a heads up that during this article about Ohio deer hunting we will talk about the best locations to hunt deer in Ohio, the history of Ohio deer hunting, Ohio deer hunting regulations as well as turkey hunting, Ohio deer season dates, and Ohio deer Outfitter. So sit back, and get ready to visit Ohio deer hunting at it・s finest without leaving your computer.

During the Spring of 2007 I hired a manager here at IMB who was from Ohio. I questioned him about the State and he was quick to educate me that Ohio・s deer hunting isn・t good everywhere. In fact Ohio is the place where many East Coast hunters travel to in order to hunt big deer without having to make a trip clear out to Iowa, Illinois, Kansas, or Missouri. The problem is that many of you have been flat out disappointed in Ohio deer hunting because you・ve accidentally been talked into hunting in the high elevated hilly terrain nearly void of any agricultural crops in areas of Ohio that aren・t supreme with :wanna; be Ohio whitetail deer outfitters. Just last year a friend of mine named Greg Childers hunted Ohio. Greg hunts with us each year. After his Ohio trip I ask him how the Ohio hunt with another outfitter had been. He stated, :Man, they aint got near the deer you have, and we never saw a shooter buck.; He simply hated Ohio as we had spoiled him rotten with the monster deer of Illinois, Iowa, Missouri, and Kansas.

Having looked at the record books I knew that Ohio deer hunting had to be good somewhere. Like any state you must be in the prime counties, and not just in the state with an Ohio deer outfitter. Then the research began. As you can see on our chart located at http://www.imbmonsterbucks.com/ohio-deer.htm This chart literally shows you all the counties within the shape of Ohio with the recorded deer harvests from last year. It・s here you will discover that if your gonna hunt Ohio that you need to be in THE GOLDEN TRIANGLE OF OHIO which is located in Coshocton, Guernsey, and Tuscarawas Counties. We looked at other counties in Ohio for deer hunting and were disappointed but upon entering in the aforementioned counties we discovered the best deer hunting in Ohio. Without a doubt. The backdrop is one that is very similar to Missouri. Plenty of timber with agricultural crops and dairy farms. At first the landowners were not open to any outsiders. It is literally the hardest place we have searched to sign up great deer hunting ground. After weeks of communication and driving to and from Ohio the walls began to crumble. Farmers began to become convinced IMB Outfitters would conduct hunts in a organized fashion and be of benefit to the community. What is so strange about Ohio deer hunting is that outside of these 3 counties, the State just did not turn me on. I even called several deer outfitters in Ohio as if I were a client and they stated if I hunted with them I would see 5 or 6 deer a day but that I could expect to probably shoot a 130 inch deer if I were lucky. Now I don・t know about you, but that just doesn・t meet my expectations. I want on 150 plus deer and I want constant deer action to keep me from getting bored with the possibility of taking a Boone and Crockett Buck from Ohio. Thus we headed for the Golden Triangle to see what all the :hoopla; was about and struck gold.

We walked out many farms after weeks of begging. Some of the farmers who we approached wouldn・t・ even let us up the driveway. It was tough. In the evening we would film only to see dozens and dozens deer pour out onto the agricultural fields. If your looking for a great Ohio deer outfitter look no further than IMB Outfitters. As time went on we began signing up farms that were nothing short of breath taking. The hunting land we have in Ohio is nothing short of awesome. In fact we haven・t hunted the ground and will not begin hunting it until 2011. For the most part the thousands of acres we leased in Ohio has gone unhunted or unoutfitted. Our land in Ohio for deer hunting is simply awesome and just down the road from Horton Crossbows Properties. (That ought to lay hint that we are in the prime locations.) As we all know Horton is a reputable company that knows exactly where to run deer hunts in Ohio. Later we will discuss the fact it is legal to use crossbows during archery season in Ohio. Now that is a new thing for us. In all our other states you have to be handicapped to use a crossbow but not in Ohio. Thus this provokes another thought about Ohio deer hunting. For a buck to make it into the record books you must use a bow for Pope and Young. Notice Ohio is #4 on the list for States with the most entries in Pope and Young Record Books. Knowing a majority of its archery hunters use crossbows this is quite impressive as Ohio is raking in record book deer a minority group of compound bow hunters.

OHIO DEER HUNTING DATES

Ohio Archery Dates for 2011 are 9-25 to 1-11
1st Gun Hunt is 11-29 to 12-2
2nd Gun Hunt is 12-18 to 12-19
Late Muzzleloader Hunts in Ohio 1-8 to 1-11


















HISTORY OF OHIO WHITETAIL DEER

In 1988, the Ohio General Assembly made the White-tailed Deer Ohio's official state mammal. The White-tailed Deer, Odocoileus virginianus, has been extremely important in Ohio's history.

The state tree, the Ohio Buckeye, is named because its nut resembles a deer�or buck's�eye. Buckeye is based on the Indian word "hetuck," meaning "eye of the buck." White-tailed Deer have been in Ohio since the end of the last Ice Age. At this point in time, the deer lived in the unglaciated portion of southeastern Ohio. The deer played a very important role in the lives of practically all of Ohio's prehistoric Indian cultures. Ohio's native people used the deer's meat for food, the hide for clothing, and the bones and antlers for tools. Indians also used the hides, antlers, and bones for ceremonial purposes. Archaeologists have found deer antlers sheathed in copper at a prehistoric site, and Hopewell craftspeople made shaman characters wearing deer antlers.

As the Ice Age ended, the White-tailed Deer spread across Ohio. The deer population before 1775 was healthy and stable because of good food and cover. The wolf, cougar, and Indian hunters limited the deer population slightly. The White-tailed Deer was the most important food source for the Indians. As they did during prehistoric times, Indians used deer for many reasons, including for food, clothing, and for tools.

As the Europeans entered into what is now modern-day Ohio, they too used deer to their own advantage. Europeans considered deer hide to be very valuable. They used deerskins in barter and trade with the Indians and with other Europeans. The slang term "buck," referring to a dollar, dates to this time when deerskins (commonly called buckskins) were used to trade and barter for supplies. According to a report in 1779, "A large buckskin is valued at a Spanish dollar; two doeskins are regarded as equal in value to one buckskin."

As white settlers began to carve farms out of Ohio's forests, the deer population decreased. To try and save Ohio's dwindling deer population, Ohio's government established hunting restrictions in 1857. However hunting seasons that lasted over a month with no bag limits continued through most of the 1800s. In 1882, A.W. Brayton wrote, "The Virginia Deer is rarely met with in Ohio at present, except as domesticated in parts." Because of the deer population's decimation, there were no hunting seasons between 1897 and 1899.

By 1904, White-tailed Deer no longer existed in Ohio. During the 1920s and the 1930s, a limited restocking program began, as well as the natural migration of deer from surrounding states into Ohio. By 1937 White-tailed Deer were reported in twenty-eight of Ohio's counties, and in 1943, enough deer existed in the state for a regulated hunting season to occur in select counties. By 1956, deer existed in all of Ohio's counties, and hunting now occurred across the state. In 1995, Ohio's deer population had reached 550,000 animals.

Whitetail deer hunting Ohio is booming these days. Record breaking harvests and record breaking trophy bucks seem to be a very common occurrence in this state. The 2006 season saw a record 237,000+ deers taken. One very notable trophy buck was a 291 2/8, taken in Adams County by John Schmucker with a crossbow. In fact, many believe that Ohio is the state for trophy bucks at this time in deer hunting history. It is hard to argue with the results, with several of the largest bucks in the world were taken in Ohio during the past few years.


Whether or not a buck becomes a real trophy is based on genes, nutrition and age. For several years Ohio had pretty restrictive hunting regulations and this took the pressure off their deer herd. During that time, the bucks were able to age. That and combination of a great gene pool and plenty of food led to an ideal situation for huntings looking to harvest a nice mantlepiece.


Ohio is home to the Buckeye Big Buck Club (BBBC), created in 1957. This organization is the official keeper of trophy whitetail records in the state, and membership is limited to hunters who take a buck with at least a score of 140 for typicals and 160 for non-typicals. The club has experienced rapid growth over the past few years, with so many large bucks being taken.

Ohio・s deer population is not distributed evenly across the state, although big bucks have been taken in every county. The best deer hunting population can be found in the central to south and east portions of Ohio. The northeastern part of the state has a good many deer, and it is a bit more sparse in the northwest. Interestingly enough, some of the biggest trophy deer have been taken in the western part of the state, proving yet again that a light population doesn・t always mean that you can・t find a monster out there.

Finally, not only are the deer plentious and large, you have a lot more time for hunting in Ohio, with a deer hunting season that starts in October and runs through January. All of these factors add up to make Ohio one of the best places for deer hunters in the USA. This is all very fitting for a state whose most enduring symbol is the Ohio Buckeye tree, named so because its nut resembles the shape and color of a deer・s eye. Deer and deer hunting are a big part of Ohio!

Ohio Deer Hunting Facts
X One of the longest deer hunting seasons in the United States (Late September through early February in 2007!)
X Deer herd numbering at an estimated 600,000+
X Largest typical buck score is a tie with two bucks scoring 201 1/8 harvested in 1986 and 2005
X Largest non-typical buck was a 304 6/8 taken in 2000 in Greene County.
X The 304 6/8 non-typical noted above is the largest non-typical every harvested by a hunter according to the Boone and Crockett Club scoring and record sheet. This buck is known as the Beatty Buck (taken by Mike Beatty).

OHIO DEER HUNTING REGULATIONS

To hunt deer in Ohio you must buy a hunting non resident annual license for $125, and in addition you have to buy a $24 hunting deer permit. Season dates for archery are Sept 25 to Feb 10. Hunter safety course is not required unless your under the age of 21.

Hunter Orange Requirement for Ohio Deer Hunts

Hunting any wild animal (except waterfowl) from 1/2 hour before sunrise to sunset during the youth deer gun season, deer gun season, deer gun weekend (Dec. 18 & 19), the statewide muzzleloader deer season, and on designated areas during the early muzzleloader deer season is unlawful unless the hunter is visibly wearing a vest, coat, jacket, or coveralls that are either solid hunter orange or camouflage hunter orange. This requirement applies statewide on both public and private land.

Camouflage Ground Blinds
Use caution when hunting from a camouflaged ground blind. For your safety, mark it with a hunter orange flag or band.

Deer Hunting Permits for Ohio deer hunts

In addition to your Ohio annual hunting license, you must purchase a Deer Permit ($24) or an Antlerless Deer Permit ($15) to hunt deer in Ohio. The Deer Permit ($24) is good for an antlered or antlerless deer and is valid statewide.

The Deer Permit is valid Sept. 25, 2010 through Feb. 6, 2011.

Antlerless Deer Permits may only be purchased until November 28, 2010.

Deer Permit ($24)


The Deer Permit is good for an antlered or antlerless deer and is valid statewide. No more than one (1) antlered deer may be taken per license year. These permits may be used during any of the deer hunting seasons, for controlled hunts or in designated Urban Units. These permits may be purchased individually throughout the entire deer season. Refer to the Deer Permit Use and Bag Limits per Zone section to determine the number of Deer Permits you can use in each deer hunting zone.

Antlerless Deer Permit ($15)

Hunters are not required to buy a Deer Permit before purchasing any Antlerless Deer Permits.
Antlerless Deer Permits may be used to take antlerless deer ONLY. These permits may be purchased individually until Nov. 28, 2010. Antlerless deer permits are valid statewide between Sept. 25 and Nov. 28. Antlerless Deer Permits may be used in Zone C through Dec. 5. These permits are also valid at Division of Wildlife controlled hunts, the early muzzleloader season, youth deer gun season, and within designated Urban Deer Units (see Urban Deer Units). Refer to the Deer Permit Use and Bag Limits per Zone section to determine the number of Antlerless Deer Permits you can use in each deer hunting zone.

What is an Antlerless Deer?
Antlered deer are deer with at least one antler 3 inches or longer in length. Antlerless deer include deer without antlers and deer with antlers less than 3 inches in length.

Deer Hunting Hours for Ohio deer hunts

Archery season hours are 1/2 hour before sunrise to 1/2 hour after sunset.

Deer Gun Season, Youth Deer Gun Season, the Early Muzzleloader Season, and Statewide Muzzleloader Season hours for deer hunting are 1/2 hour before sunrise to sunset.

Deer Tagging for Ohio deer hunts

Every person who kills a deer must immediately fill out the temporary tag with the name and address of the hunter and date and time the deer was killed, detach the temporary tag from their deer permit, and immediately attach that tag to the dead deer at the place where it fell. Your temporary deer tag must be separated from the deer permit and tied to the deer.

The material used to produce the licenses and permits has changed and will need to be protected from the elements. You may choose to purchase a reusable license/tag protective holder if available at the license vendor or many office supply stores or make your own.

Licenses and permits will need to be protected from the elements. You may choose to purchase a reusable license/tag protective holder if available at the license vendor or many offi ce supply stores or make your own. Attach a piece of string, wire, etc. to your temporary tag and protective holder before you hunt. Carry a pen or pencil and a watch with you to fi ll out your temporary tag. The temporary tag must remain on the deer until it is taken to an official deer check station for permanent tagging. See Deer Check Station Locations online. Once a temporary tag is detached from the permit, it is illegal to hunt or pursue deer with a hunting device without purchasing an additional valid deer permit (See Concealed Carry information).

For multiple deer permit holders, the first deer taken in the day must have been temporarily tagged before hunting or pursuing another deer.

Hunters with deer permits must use the temporary tag from the permit. Landowners and tenants who take a deer on their land and any other person not required to purchase a deer permit as well as hunters who purchase a deer permit over the Internet must make and attach their own tag with their name, address, and date and time killed. This tag must be attached to the dead deer immediately in the field at the place were it fell.

Deer Permits Purchased Over the Internet for Ohio deer hunts

Hunters who purchase a deer permit over the Internet must fill in the date, time, and county where the deer was killed on the bottom portion of the permit they are carrying. This must be completed and kept by the hunter. DO NOT DETACH. The hunter then must make and attach their own temporary tag with their name, address, and date and time the deer was killed and attach it to the deer in the field at the place were it fell.

Take something with you to make a sturdy temporary tag and something to tie it on with when packing gear for your hunt.

Deer Checking for Ohio deer hunts

Only the person who kills the deer can present it to the check station. All deer must be checked in the county of harvest or an adjacent county, except an antlerless deer taken within an Urban Deer Unit must be checked in the Urban Unit where killed.

It is unlawful to attach a temporary tag to a deer taken by another person.

Deer must be checked by 8:00 p.m. on the day after harvest, except a deer taken on the last day of the archery season (Feb. 6), the youth gun season (Nov. 21), the gun season (Dec. 5 and Dec. 19), the early muzzleloader season (Oct. 23), or the statewide muzzleloader season (Jan. 11) must be checked by 8:00 p.m. that day.

Tree Stands for Ohio deer hunts

It is unlawful to construct, place or use a permanent-type tree stand, or to place spikes, nails, wires or other metal objects into a tree to act as steps or to hold a tree stand on public hunting lands. It is also unlawful to make any of these changes to trees on private property without first getting the permission of the landowner or the landowner・s authorized agent. Tree stands and deer blinds must be removed from public hunting areas by the last day of the deer archery season.

Allowable Hunting Equipment
Archery Season:
Longbow or bow means a device for propelling an arrow by means of limbs, and a string which is hand-held, hand-drawn and held in a drawn position by hand, or hand-held mechanical release, or by a mechanical device with a working safety. This would include compound bows and recurve bows. Minimum draw weight 40 lbs. Crossbow means a device for propelling an arrow by means of transverse limbs and a string, mounted on a stock of at least 25 inches in length, and having a working safety: draw weight not less than 75 lbs. The arrow tip shall have a minimum of two cutting edges which may be exposed or unexposed and minimum 3/4-inch width. Expandable and mechanical broadheads are legal. Poisoned or explosive arrows are illegal.

Gun Season and Youth Deer Gun Season:
10-gauge or smaller shotgun using one ball or one rifled slug per barrel (rifled shotgun barrels are permitted when using shotgun slug ammunition); or muzzleloading rifle .38 caliber or larger; or handgun with 5-inch minimum length barrel, using straight-walled cartridges .357 caliber or larger, or longbow, crossbow (draw weight limitations same as for Archery Season). Shotguns cannot be capable of holding more than three shells.

Statewide Muzzleloader Season for Ohio deer hunts:
Longbow, crossbow (draw weight limitations same as for archery season), muzzleloading rifle .38 caliber or larger, or muzzleloading shotgun of 10-gauge or smaller using one ball per barrel. Hunters cannot carry more than one firearm while hunting deer. See Concealed Carry information.

A Deer Hunter CANNOT do any of the following during an Ohio deer hunt:
1. Hunt or take a deer with a shotgun capable of holding more than three shells. This means you may not hunt with a shotgun capable of holding more than three shells, unless it is plugged with a one-piece filler
which limits the capacity of the gun to three shells. The fi ller must be such that it cannot be removed without disassembling the gun.
2. Hunt with any rifle during the deer gun, the youth deer gun, the Early Muzzleloader hunts (Salt Fork Wildlife Area, Wildcat Hollow, and Shawnee State Forest), and the statewide muzzleloader seasons other than a muzzleloading rifl e .38 caliber or larger.
3. Hunt or take a deer with a gun or possess a loaded fi rearm while going to and from deer hunting during the deer gun, youth deer gun, and the statewide muzzleloader seasons, at anytime other than 1/2 hour before sunrise to sunset. NOTE: Muzzleloading firearms are considered unloaded when the cap is removed or priming powder is removed from the pan or when the battery is removed on electronic systems.
4. Carry a handgun while hunting deer during the early muzzleloader season (on designated areas), the statewide muzzleloader season, and archery season; have more than one firearm while hunting deer; carry
a handgun being used during hunting in a concealed manner.
5. Use a muzzleloading handgun for deer hunting.
6. Hunt deer with a longbow having a draw weight of less than 40 pounds, or with a crossbow having a draw weight of less than 75 pounds. Expandable and mechanical broadheads are legal. Poisoned or explosive arrows are illegal.
7. Carry a firearm while deer hunting with a longbow or crossbow.
8. Have attached to a longbow or crossbow any mechanical, electrical or electronic device capable of projecting a beam of light.
9. Use dogs to hunt deer. Leashed dogs may be used to track wounded deer.
10. Possess shotshells containing shot during the deer gun season, unless waterfowl hunting when the season is open or as explained in number nine of the previous section.
11. Hunt coyote or boar between sunset and 1/2 hour before sunrise during deer gun season.
12. Use any device capable of transmitting or receiving a person・s voice to aid in the hunting or taking of deer.
13. Pursue wounded deer or other wild animals or recover dead deer or other wild animals from private property without the written permission of the landowner. See Page 36.
14. Carry the deer permit of another person.
15. Receive or possess a deer or parts of a deer unless such deer or deer part is tagged as required or unless the deer or part of a deer has a statement showing when and where legally taken, the date received, and from whom received; or a Division of Wildlife tag, seal, or certificate or other proof of ownership which shows the deer was killed by a motor vehicle in Ohio; or an official tag or seal and valid nonresident license issued by another state if taken from outside Ohio; or certificate of ownership or receipt issued by a wildlife officer. Shed antlers, if found, do not require a certificate of ownership or
receipt by a wildlife officer.
16. Construct, place or use a permanent-type tree stand, or to place spikes, nails, wires or other metal objects into a tree to act as steps or to hold a tree stand on public hunting lands. It is also unlawful to make any of these changes to trees on private property without first getting the permission of the landowner or the landowner・s authorized agent. Tree stands and deer blinds must be removed from public hunting areas by the last day of the deer archery season.

A Hunter CAN do the following during an Ohio deer hunt:
1. Field dress a deer before transporting to an official deer check station for final inspection and tagging as long as the head remains attached to the body.
2. Aid or assist another hunter who is hunting deer if the temporary tag has been removed from their deer permit as long as he or she does not carry any hunting device commonly used to kill wild animals and has a valid hunting license. Those persons exempted from having a hunting license and deer permits for deer hunting on their property are required to have a hunting license and deer permit to aid another hunter or hunt deer off of their property.
3. Use certain handguns during the youth deer gun season and deer gun season. These handguns must: (a) have a barrel length of not less than 5 inches, (b) use straight-walled cartridges (no shoulder/ neck; straight-tapered wall is acceptable) and (c) be .357 caliber or larger.
4. Leave a deer or deer parts with a taxidermist, fur buyer, cold storage, locker plant, or meat processing plant as long as a tag or seal is attached to it that lists the owner・s name and address and the date and place where the deer was killed. Persons receiving deer from another person must keep records with the owner・s name and address, the date, time, and place where the deer was legally taken and the date it was received.
5. Take more than one deer per day as long as each deer has been tagged with a temporary tag before hunting for the next deer.
6. Hunt deer over bait except on public land (see Page 37).
7. Possess a communication device as long as you do not use the device to aid a person in pursuing or taking of deer.
8. Hunt coyote and wild boar during the deer gun season and statewide muzzleloader deer season with a hunting license and a valid deer permit, using fi rearms legal for deer hunting while visibly wearing a vest,
coat, jacket or coverall colored solid hunter orange or camoufl age hunter orange. A valid deer permit is a deer permit, with temporary tag attached, and valid for the zone or unit being hunted.
9. Hunt other wild animals other than deer, coyotes, or wild boar during the Saturday, December 18 and Sunday, December 19 gun season, as long as they possess no shot shells larger than number four shot and comply with hunter orange requirements. No one may hunt with a rifl e other than a muzzleloading rifl e legal for deer, or posses rifle ammunition.
10. Use a leashed dog to recover wounded deer.
11. Deer archery hunt during the youth deer gun season, if the archery hunter is not accompanying a hunter participating in the youth deer gun season (See Youth Deer Gun Season, Pager 13).

Hunting Other Game During the Youth Deer Gun, Deer Gun, and Muzzleloader Seasons
Youth Deer Gun Season V It is lawful to hunt legal game and furbearers (including coyote and wild boar). It is unlawful to use or possess slugs except youth hunters hunting deer. Waterfowl hunting and the night hunting of furbearers is also permitted when the season is open. All persons (except waterfowl hunters) hunting or accompanying a youth hunter during the youth deer gun season are required to wear hunter orange. Archery deer hunters may hunt until 1/2 hour after sunset during the Youth Deer Gun Season ans are required to wear hunter orange.

Deer Gun Season - During the seven-day deer gun season (Nov. 29, 2010 - Dec. 5, 2010) it is unlawful to hunt any wild animal except deer, coyote, wild boar, or waterfowl statewide from 1/2 hour before sunrise to sunset. Hunters must possess a deer permit with the temporary tag attached that is valid for the zone or unit being hunted. Hunters may not possess rifl e ammunition or shot shells (except waterfowl hunters), however, hunters using a muzzleloading rifle; .38 caliber or larger may possess ammunition for that rifle. Furbearers, except coyote, and wild boar can be hunted from sunset to 1/2 hour before sunrise when the deer gun season is open. All persons (except waterfowl hunters) hunting during the deer gun season are required to wear hunter orange.

Statewide Muzzleloader Deer Season - It is lawful to hunt legal game and furbearers (including coyote and wild boar) with shot shells containing shot no larger than #4 (except waterfowl hunters may use larger nontoxic shot). If you are hunting coyote or boar during the statewide muzzleloader deer season with a device that is lawful for deer hunting, you must also have a deer permit with the temporary tag attached that is valid for the zone or unit being hunted. Waterfowl hunting and the night hunting of furbearers is also permitted when the season is open. All persons (except waterfowl hunters) hunting during the statewide muzzleloader deer gun season are required to wear hunter orange.

Youth Deer Gun Season
A youth deer gun season will be open statewide, Nov. 20 and 21, 2010 on public and private land. Young hunters 17 years old and younger at the time they purchase their Youth Hunting License, Youth Deer Permit, and who are accompanied by a non-hunting adult may hunt. Accompany means to go along with another person while staying within a distance from the person that enables uninterrupted, unaided visual and auditory communications. See the Youth Hunting Section for details.

Cervid Carcass Regulations for Those Hunting Out-of-State
Ohio hunters who travel out of state to hunt cervids (deer, elk, moose, caribou) in areas where chronic wasting disease (CWD) has been detected may only possess the following parts of the cervid carcass in Ohio:

(1) De-boned meat;
(2) Meat that is cut and securely and completely wrapped either commercially or privately with no part of the spinal column or head attached;
(3) Quarters or other portions of meat with no part of the spinal column or head attached;
(4) Antlers;
(5) Antlers attached to a skull cap from which all soft tissue has been removed;
(6) Upper canine teeth from which all soft tissue has been removed;
(7) Hides or capes without any part of the head or lymph nodes attached;
(8) Finished taxidermy mounts;
(9) Any soft body tissue wrapped and packaged for use by a diagnostic research laboratory.

Out of state hunters traveling through Ohio may possess any cervidae carcass or part of a cervidae carcass, legally taken or possesses, provided the carcass or parts thereof are not off-loaded from the vehicle in which the carcass enter the state.








Darrin Bradley

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